There’s nothing quite like the classic combination of chocolate and hazelnuts to quench a craving. But did you know it can also quench free radicals? This simple recipe is the stuff of sweet dreams.

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  • Preparation Time

    20 minutes
  • Cooking Time

    5 minutes
  • Difficulty Rating

    2
  • Health Level

    4
  • Serves

    32

Ingredients

  1. 3 cups / 405 g raw hazelnuts, unsalted
  2. ⅓ cup / 75 g roasted cacao nibs or 3½ cups / 100 g dark chocolate (preferably more than 60% cacao), chopped
  3. ¾ cup / 150 g raw sugar
  4. 2 Tbsp. / 30 ml unrefined coconut and/or hazelnut oil
  5. 1 tsp. / 5 ml pure vanilla extract
  6. ⅛ tsp. / ¾ g salt

Directions

    1. Spread hazelnuts in a single layer in a baking sheet. Place sheet in the middle rack of an oven, and toast under the broil/grill setting. Allow to roast for several minutes until lightly browned and emitting a characteristic "toasted" scent, turning periodically to prevent burning
    2. Remove the sheet from the oven and allow to cool just enough to enable safe handling
    3. Meanwhile, place the sugar in a food processor or high-speed blender/chopper, and grind to a powdery texture, about 30 seconds.
    4. While the sugar dust settles, place the cooled nuts on a silicone mat, fold it, and roll and massage the nuts to release the skins. Discard the skins or set aside for reuse— they make a great eco-friendly skin buffer or soil supplement.
    5. Remove the sugar from the food processor, and set aside in a separate container

    6. If using cacao nibs:

      1. Add the nibs and nuts to a food processor or high speed blender/chopper. Purée for about 5 minutes; as the ingredients build up on the sides of the canister, scrape them down to reincorporate
      2. Add the oil and vanilla extract, and purée for another 5 minutes, until creamy.
      3. Add the sugar, and purée for another 30-60 seconds, until smooth

      If using solid chocolate:

      1. Add the nuts to a food processor or high speed blender/chopper. Purée for about 5 minutes; as the ingredients build up on the sides of the canister, scrape them down to reincorporate
      2. Melt the chopped chocolate in a microwave oven or over a double boiler until syrupy.
      3. Add the melted chocolate, oil and vanilla extract, and purée for another 5 minutes, until creamy.
      4. Add the sugar, and purée for another 30-60 seconds, until smooth.

      Store in a clean jar at room temperature for up to 3 weeks.

      Serving size:2 tablespoons / 30 ml

      Exchanges per Serving: 1 Sweet


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Comments 21

  1. Profile photo of JRStrafer

    I like your approach here. I’ve always felt that a diet is individual choices, ie. the correct choices at the correct time. The idea of 6 small meals per day seems logical to me. I am a retired nurse anesthetist and I agree that a balance in the glucose – insulin cycle is the correct way to do this. TY for using real science here. Jim

  2. Profile photo of millja

    This is sure taking a lot of time to get menus that I like set up…….do I have to do the same each week, or do I have the option of using the same dinners several times in a week, or lunches…….. ? Like that ?

  3. Profile photo of ljlinehan

    I am liking the exchange menu a lot. I am not totally organic, not vegetarian, but I like that I can try something out at my own pace. I like vegetables of all kinds and it is helpful to me to have individual portions so I can mix it up a bit. Thanks

    • Profile photo of reenie4nier

      this actually reminds me of Nutella that you can buy but I am having a blast using my magic bullet and making my own nut butters, etc. Love experimenting. I am using what I have in the cupboards so far and just checking what I can substitute for what they suggest from the long long line of substitutions they provide.

  4. Profile photo of smburris

    Is there anyway that you you all can list the nutritional value labels on your recipes? Labels are so important to know exactly what we are putting in our body especially when some of these products are not well known to us.

    • Profile photo of ossie-sharon

      Hi, smburris. We are working on that. In the meantime, you can refer to the exchanges at the end of the recipe for reference. Their general nutritional values are as follows:
      1 carb exchange = 15 grams of carbohydrates + up to 3 grams of protein
      1 protein exchange = 7 grams of protein + up to 5 grams of fat
      1 fat exchange = 5 grams of fat
      1 fruit exchange = 15 grams of carbohydrates
      1 vegetable exchange = 5 grams of carbohydrates + up to 2 grams of protein
      1 sweet exchange = up to 15 grams of carbohydrates + up to 5 grams of fat
      1 free exchange = up to 5 grams of carbohydrates or up to 2 grams of protein or fat

  5. Profile photo of JaneRickard

    I agree with the above comments . I too thought when I joined that I was going to be able to eat normal foods but be advised in which order . I have just come out of hospital after the third major surgery operation for the dreaded disease. There is no way that I can either shop or prepare these recipes.
    Jane Rickard

    • Profile photo of ossie-sharon

      Hi, Dianne. The foods in our lists are actually collected from around the world (and available in the UK), but lesser known to many. They were selected because they are less mass-produced and therefore relatively unmanipulated and more nutritious and supportive of health and healthy weight management. I encourage you to take advantage of our shopping guide https://www.trimdownclub.com/where-to-buy-UK; on of the sites, http://www.goodnessdirect.co.uk, offers nice explanations of their foods. Regular supermarkets such as Tesco, Asda, and Waitrose are increasingly carrying these items as health-conscious consumers are increasingly requesting the; Holland and Barrett carries even more, of course, and Whole Foods Market even more.

      • Profile photo of soozannah

        I know. When I lived in England in 1985, I was really surprised by the selection or rather the “non-selection” of foods available there – and I was in London in the Chelsea district. Very few fresh fruits or veggies, even smaller still were “health” foods or such items like tofu, organic anything, raw sugar, gluten-free (of course, there wasn’t anything “gluten-free” back then but now I doubt if it is readily available.

  6. Profile photo of lauradelores

    I am not happy with what i’ve read for meals so far. This is way too much extra special foods to buy. I thought from the introductury that you would be able to eat regular food . Just how and when to eat certain foods and in what compination to burn fat or speed up metabulisim.

      • Profile photo of ossie-sharon

        Hi, mmbriggs. I’m repeating my response to lauradelores here for you: You can definitely use regular foods – when you use the personal version of the Menu Planner, you will find them in the lists. As long as you favor relatively unprocessed foods, you can benefit from the program as a whole, with the other features.
        Like any major lifestyle change, it’s best if you just ease into it and try small changes at the most comfortable pace. You don’t have to be perfect, just do a little better each time, and it will add up.

    • Profile photo of ossie-sharon

      Hi, lauradelores. You can definitely use regular foods – when you use the personal version of the Menu Planner, you will find them in the lists. As long as you favor relatively unprocessed foods, you can benefit from the program as a whole, with the features you mentioned.

  7. Profile photo of Virginia50832

    Loved it just sweet enough. Don’t know if I ground my nibs enough or the sugar. The nibs tryed to pack together I had to add the sugar . It was a little grainy but delicious! I put mine over coconut cookies, that had raisins, dried cranberries walnuts in them. Also I had coconut in the coco nibs yum.

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