Classic omelette with a savory twist.

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  • Preparation Time

    10 minutes

  • Cooking Time

    5 minutes

  • Difficulty Rating

    1

  • Health Level

    4

  • Serves

    1

Total Shares 0

Ingredients

  1. 2 fresh eggs, preferably organic omega-3 or pastured
  2. ¼ green sweet bell pepper, chopped
  3. ¼ red sweet bell pepper, chopped
  4. ⅛ cup / 30 ml water or milk
  5. Herbs and spices to taste
  6. 1 strip bacon (preferably organic, uncured), cooked, drained, and chopped
  7. 1 tsp. / 5 ml high-oleic safflower oil

Directions

  1. Brush oil on the bottom of a non-stick skillet, and warm over medium heat.
  2. Scramble eggs in small bowl. Add remaining ingredients and mix well.
  3. Pour mixture into pan. As the omelette solidifies, lift up edges and turn pan to allow uncooked mixture to slide to pan surface and cook
  4. When the middle of the omelette stops puddling, flip over in the pan. When brown on both sides, put in a dinner plate

Serving size:1 omelette

Exchanges per Serving: 2 Protein, 1 Fat, ½ Vegetable


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Comments 79

    • Hi, Adasahari. It depends on what else you would like to have at breakfast – you can generally have more than one thing at a time. You can see how much you are allotted for each meal by clicking on the “Exchange mode” icon in the toolbar above your menu, then comparing the exchanges for each meal to the exchanges in your menus and items of choice. The list of exchanges for general foods is here: https://www.trimdownclub.com/exchanges-lists. Note that you can substitute protein exchanges in place of carbohydrate exchanges, if you wish.

    • Hi, Woodyacres. We don’t offer that specific information, but you can use the exchanges listed at the end of Trim Down Club recipes to keep track of the major categories: total carbohydrate, protein, and fat. The following is the approximate translation of exchanges:
      1 carbohydrate exchange = 15 grams of carbohydrates + up to 3 grams of protein
      1 protein exchange = 7 grams of protein + up to 5 grams of fat
      1 fat exchange = 5 grams of fat
      1 fruit exchange = 15 grams of carbohydrates
      1 vegetable exchange = 5 grams of carbohydrates + up to 2 grams of protein
      1 sweet exchange = up to 15 grams of carbohydrates + up to 5 grams of fat
      1 free exchange = up to 5 grams of carbohydrates or up to 2 grams of protein or fat

      • I’m finding this all very confusing. Not even sure how to get my menu going. My diet has been pretty limited for such a long time due to diabetes and other issues!! Also I’m sure this is not the place for this commentary but I’m not finding where to ask questions. Thanks Marilyn

        • Hi, Marilyn. You’ve come to the right place! This program is based on principles of diabetes management. A good initial reference is our “Quick Start Guide,” which you can access through the “My Guides” link near the top of each site page. On the home page, you will find a link to our menu-building Menu Planner application, which you can use to generate healthy menus based on your nutritional needs and food preferences.

  1. Wouldn’t it be helpful to have a breakdown of the dishes as well. Protein? Fat? Carbs? in each dish? I just joined all of 30 minutes ago and I was looking at this omelette dish for breakfast. I didn’t see the information so forgive me if its is there somewhere and I just missed it.

    • Hi, Campbell.rose1965. At the end of each recipe is the “Exchanges per Serving” section, listing food group units. The approximate nutritional value for each is as follows:
      1 carb exchange = 15 grams of carbohydrates + up to 3 grams of protein
      1 protein exchange = 7 grams of protein + up to 5 grams of fat
      1 fat exchange = 5 grams of fat
      1 fruit exchange = 15 grams of carbohydrates
      1 vegetable exchange = 5 grams of carbohydrates + up to 2 grams of protein
      1 sweet exchange = up to 15 grams of carbohydrates + up to 5 grams of fat
      1 free exchange = up to 5 grams of carbohydrates or up to 2 grams of protein or fat

      • I am so confused. I thought this was a program that didn’t count carbs or calories or fat. Then I see the above exchange. Are we supposed to count how many carb exchanges or fruit exchanges we can have every day?

        • Hi, ddurham. We don’t work with calories, but we do use exchanges to ensure your nutritional needs are being met (and because many of our Clubmembers are diabetics, and need to use exchanges to ensure proper medication). You can see the exchanges allotted to you for each meal and day by clicking on the “Exchange mode” icon in the toolbar above your menu. Exchanges translate to the following approximate values:
          1 carb exchange = 15 grams of carbohydrates + up to 3 grams of protein
          1 protein exchange = 7 grams of protein + up to 5 grams of fat
          1 fat exchange = 5 grams of fat
          1 fruit exchange = 15 grams of carbohydrates
          1 vegetable exchange = 5 grams of carbohydrates + up to 2 grams of protein
          1 sweet exchange = up to 15 grams of carbohydrates + up to 5 grams of fat
          1 free exchange = up to 5 grams of carbohydrates or up to 2 grams of protein or fat

    • i made an omlett today in a copper pan,so i didnt use fat.i took an egg whipped it set it asaide.then i used 6 pieces of sliced mushroom,1/4 bell pepper sliced, 1/4 small onion chopped fine, browned that add egg and good to the last spoon, had my coffee with it and 4 strawberries

    • Hi, hialgomar. We are currently working on a feature that will do this. In the meantime, I recommend selecting a similar recipe or ingredients to appear in your menu so that the shopping list will reflect what you need.

    • Hi, Jigs. After you pour the raw egg mixture into the pre-heated pan, the following actions are recommended to ensure you get an omelette instead of scrambled eggs:
      1. Use a spatula to gently drag and push the cooked eggs from the edges toward the center of the pan, making space for the uncooked eggs and forming waves in the omelette.
      2. Tilt the skillet so that the uncooked eggs flow into the open spaces.

  2. I was a bit concerned by the use of high-oleic safflower oil so I researched it and it seems the plants used to produce this are not Genetically Modified plants but are grown using radiation and toxic chemicals. Would it not be safer to use something like Virgin Olive Oil?

  3. Hi, Mary. There are very few available carbohydrates in this dish – less than 3 grams per portion, plus 4.4 grams saturated fat, and 0.038 grams trans-fats (mainly from the bacon).
    Because of your diabetes, I would recommend using only organic pastured eggs, as your system is uniquely sensitive to the composition of regular eggs. If you can’t find any, then I suggest to limit this recipe to just one egg and use smoked seasonings instead of the bacon.

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