Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 65 total)
Profile photo of eburton eburton 3 weeks ago

I like Seafood but I don’t like shrimp and it is always suggested rather than tilapia or salmon. Can I replace shrimp for organic tilapia, salmon or chicken? Is salmon too fattening?

Profile photo of Ossie-Sharon Ossie-Sharon 2 months ago

Hi, Meridith. Usually if something is whole, it indicates it – but also the absence of the word “refined” is helpful. What you found sounds great.

Profile photo of Meredithcari Meredithcari 2 months ago

How do I know if it’s whole? The ingredients are organic quinoa flour and organic corn flour. Is this a no no?

Profile photo of Ossie-Sharon Ossie-Sharon 2 months ago

Hi, Meredith. If they corn is organic and whole, it’s a great choice.

Profile photo of Meredithcari Meredithcari 2 months ago

Hi. I’m a little confused. Many gluten free pastas are made with corn. I thought corn was a no no. My menu says gluten free pasta but doesn’t specify what kind.

Profile photo of Ossie-Sharon Ossie-Sharon 5 months ago

Hi, beluka. The video discussed artificial or overprocessed versions of popular foods that should be healthy, but have been manipulated into being particularly harmful to your goals. Rather than giving up on them altogether, we encourage better versions in their original, natural forms. Note that the foods discussed in the video are only examples, and many other popular foods have been similarly affected—so it’s good to read labels, be aware of how a food is made, and choose whole foods as much as possible.
1. Regular “whole wheat” bread – this often also contains refined flours, so it is preferred to select “100% whole” grain products (wheat or other). Even with these products, be sure to read the label and avoid hydrogenated fats or similar ingredients such as mono- and diglycerides.
2. Regular margarine – this is often made from chemically altered fats that create health risks similar to those people are trying to avoid by eating a plant-based product. If you must use a hardened oil, t is better to choose those based on coconut oil, and otherwise to use healthy liquid oils, such as olive, as much as possible.
3. Artificial sweeteners – you can read more about this here: http://www.trimdownclub.com/the-best-way-to-sweeten-your-tea-2.
4. Regular orange juice – If it is in a store, it is likely to have been stripped of what makes it healthy. Even if vitamins etc. have been added back in, it really is not the same. Fresh-squeezed is the way to go.
5. Conventional and overly processed soy – organic is fine, and minimally processed items such as tofu, yogurt, and milk, as well as fermented items such as tempeh and natto are fine. However, most pre-packaged mock meats tend to be a problem.

Profile photo of Ossie-Sharon Ossie-Sharon 5 months ago

Hi, beluka. The video discussed artificial or overprocessed versions of popular foods that should be healthy, but have been manipulated into being particularly harmful to your goals. Rather than giving up on them altogether, we encourage better versions in their original, natural forms. Note that the foods discussed in the video are only examples, and many other popular foods have been similarly affected—so it’s good to read labels, be aware of how a food is made, and choose whole foods as much as possible.
1. Regular “whole wheat” bread – this often also contains refined flours, so it is preferred to select “100% whole” grain products (wheat or other). Even with these products, be sure to read the label and avoid hydrogenated fats or similar ingredients such as mono- and diglycerides.
2. Regular margarine – this is often made from chemically altered fats that create health risks similar to those people are trying to avoid by eating a plant-based product. If you must use a hardened oil, t is better to choose those based on coconut oil, and otherwise to use healthy liquid oils, such as olive, as much as possible.
3. Artificial sweeteners – you can read more about this here: http://www.trimdownclub.com/the-best-way-to-sweeten-your-tea-2.
4. Regular orange juice – If it is in a store, it is likely to have been stripped of what makes it healthy. Even if vitamins etc. have been added back in, it really is not the same. Fresh-squeezed is the way to go.
5. Conventional and overly processed soy – organic is fine, and minimally processed items such as tofu, yogurt, and milk, as well as fermented items such as tempeh and natto are fine. However, most pre-packaged mock meats tend to be a problem.

Profile photo of beluka43 beluka43 5 months ago

would like have the list of the 5 foods to avoid

Profile photo of Ossie-Sharon Ossie-Sharon 7 months ago

Hi, slimjimima. Bananas are definitely not a no-no – I’m not sure where you might have seen that, but it’s not in the blurb, no worries. We have several articles on the benefits of bananas in our article collection.
As for the variety, since you have just recently started the program and selected the 8-week route, you are likely receiving automatic menus. I suggest you use the full personal Menu Planner application (in “Apps” above) so that you can select the foods you want in your menus. In your profile, you can also select the degree of variety you want in those menus. If you would like additional assistance or a refund, you can contact tech support directly through the “Contact Us” link below.
Nutritional questions, of course, you can post here, and I will get back to you.

Profile photo of slimjimima slimjimima 7 months ago

If, as your blurb claims, bananas are a no-no, why have you suggested I have them on 3 days in the first week? Why are my menus so lacking in variety when I explained that I enjoy eating most foods? Why is there so much food recommended? How can I get my money back????

Profile photo of Ossie-Sharon Ossie-Sharon 8 months ago

Hi, debraeger.The video discussed artificial or overprocessed versions of popular foods that should be healthy, but have been manipulated into being particularly harmful to your goals. Rather than giving up on them altogether, we encourage better versions in their original, natural forms. Note that the foods discussed in the video are only examples, and many other popular foods have been similarly affected—so it’s good to read labels, be aware of how a food is made, and choose whole foods as much as possible.
1. Regular “whole wheat” bread – this often also contains refined flours, so it is preferred to select “100% whole” grain products (wheat or other). Even with these products, be sure to read the label and avoid hydrogenated fats or similar ingredients such as mono- and diglycerides.
2. Regular margarine – this is often made from chemically altered fats that create health risks similar to those people are trying to avoid by eating a plant-based product. If you must use a hardened oil, t is better to choose those based on coconut oil, and otherwise to use healthy liquid oils, such as olive, as much as possible.
3. Artificial sweeteners – you can read more about this here: http://www.trimdownclub.com/the-best-way-to-sweeten-your-tea-2.
4. Regular orange juice – If it is in a store, it is likely to have been stripped of what makes it healthy. Even if vitamins etc. have been added back in, it really is not the same. Fresh-squeezed is the way to go.
5. Conventional and overly processed soy – organic is fine, and minimally processed items such as tofu, yogurt, and milk, as well as fermented items such as tempeh and natto are fine. However, most pre-packaged mock meats tend to be a problem.

Profile photo of debraeger debraeger 8 months ago

What are the 5 foods to avoid??

Profile photo of Ossie-Sharon Ossie-Sharon 8 months ago

Hi, nkeegan. All of that is absolutely fine. Just be sure to get at least 5 total fruit/vegetable servings and 3 total calcium-rich food/beverage servings each day.

Profile photo of nkeegan nkeegan 8 months ago

I am still trying to get the hang of this new lifestyle, and I still have a few questions. First, sometimes I don’t eat everything on my menu. I don’t add anything to it, but (for example) I was supposed to have 4 rice cakes for breakfast, but I only ate two. Also, I don’t always get snack 3 in (I try not to eat after 7 pm). Is this ok? Last, I printed out a new menu for this week, and I really liked Saturday’s menu best. Would it be ok to do Saturday’s menu every day this week? It would be more convenient to prepare, and it would save money.

Profile photo of Ossie-Sharon Ossie-Sharon 9 months ago

Hi, nkeegan. Repeat meals, days, and/or weeks as often as you like.

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