• Meet weight loss friends.
    Ask our experts for advice on nutrition and fitness.
  • Recent Entries from “Nutrition & Diet”

    • Profile photo of ossie-sharon Ossie-Sharon

      Hi, Patty. Thanks for that information. There's definitely room for compromise, and I'm happy to help in whatever I can. First, you can cut back a bit on the foods in your menu, preferably from the starchy carbs. Stick with the protein and produce foods. Second, walking or even being on your feet is not essential for physical activity, but some form of exercise is very important to your health - if you lose weight without it, you will lose muscle, and that can impact your organs and ultimately function. The following are a few of our videos for ideas to get you started: Deskercise https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mn8Vpzjoz2I&list=PLcYLl4MTY9oQv--HKsFLgST544prdjBx1&index=3 PiYo Toe Touches https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7QD5ZZT7-qA&list=PLWmqdoUmET9ivlQB72ZWE551APDSXARAe&index=2 Lower Body Slim and Toning https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g6ZWuV2wh4M Abs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X6wm2pXpUiY&index=1&list=PLcYLl4MTY9oQv--HKsFLgST544prdjBx1

      Go to this topic
    • Profile photo of ossie-sharon Ossie-Sharon

      Your body’s reaction is quite normal if you were previously on such a restrictive diet. Your metabolism has simply slowed, and it may take several weeks for your body to get used to normal amounts of food again. Because of the huge difference, I would suggest to bring down the amount of food in your menu by entering a goal weight of 81.6 (just 0.21 lower than your current goal weight) as your current weight. Most importantly, the most reliable (and healthiest) way to give your body a boost here is through physical activity. This is not just because of the extra energy it burns, but also because it protects and strengthens your most important fat-burning asset, muscle tissue. If you are new to exercise, please let us know, and we can assist you with resources on getting started if you wish—note that you don’t have to dive headfirst into anything strenuous, and that there are helpful exercises to fit all ability levels and time schedules. Even just walking in place in front of the TV for the length of a sitcom is great—if you feel like you’re “out of shape,” just start with 5 minutes each time, and work your way up to 30 minutes, then twice per day if you need. Be sure to switch your exercise routine every three weeks to keep your muscles "guessing" and not complacent. It doesn’t have to be super strenuous, just something you can do on a regular basis. Even just lifting filled food cans in front of the TV counts. A particularly recommended option is to mix up the rhythm by adding bursts of higher intensity movement to a steady aerobic regime. This can be something like 30 seconds of jogging or going uphill every 5 minutes during a regular walk. Regardless of your situation, it is recommended to you discuss your plans with your health care provider to be sure any needed safety steps are taken.

      Go to this topic
    • Nutrition & Diet forum
  • Recent Entries from “Fitness”

    • Profile photo of mbuegel mbuegel

      I feel for you. I am in the a similar but lighter boat. Had 2 spinal surgeries, cant have a third. have bad right knee, foot pain etc etc but I am walking with a cane. I went to a pain management doctor which gave me "ablation" (burning of nerves) on both side of my spine. relieved pain by at least 75% they said will last 4 to 8 months. but because of knee and foot pain he recommended a spine stimulator (pulsing) which I plan on doing. Sooooo. But if you cannot walk (yet) I recommend using exercise bands (Amazon) to strengthen your upper body first. I had to go to therapy to do it because my discipline is nul regarding doing exercises at home... but all in all keep smiling despite everything and take things slow. little steps as my husband used to say..

      Go to this topic
    • Profile photo of ossie-sharon Ossie-Sharon

      Hi, Debby. Here are a few methods for managing urinary incontinence recommended by the American College of Physicians and Mayo Clinic, and how they help: Kegel exercises work for all kinds of urinary incontinence. They strengthen the pelvic floor muscles, which are used to hold in urine. Kegels are done by repeatedly squeezing and relaxing the pelvic floor muscles. To get started: • Find the right muscles. To identify your pelvic floor muscles, stop urination in midstream. If you succeed, you've got the right muscles. Once you've identified your pelvic floor muscles you can do the exercises in any position, although you might find it easiest to do them lying down at first. • Perfect your technique. Tighten your pelvic floor muscles, hold the contraction for five seconds, and then relax for five seconds. Try it four or five times in a row. Work up to keeping the muscles contracted for 10 seconds at a time, relaxing for 10 seconds between contractions. • Maintain your focus. For best results, focus on tightening only your pelvic floor muscles. Be careful not to flex the muscles in your abdomen, thighs or buttocks. Avoid holding your breath. Instead, breathe freely during the exercises. • Repeat three times a day. Aim for at least three sets of 10 repetitions a day.Don't make a habit of using Kegel exercises to start and stop your urine stream. Doing Kegel exercises while emptying your bladder can actually lead to incomplete emptying of the bladder — which increases the risk of a urinary tract infection. If you have trouble doing Kegels, or they don’t seem to be working, a physical therapist can use techniques like biofeedback to help you find the right muscles to squeeze. Pelvic floor physical therapy can also improve posture, which helps keep pelvic floor muscles functioning properly. Bladder training (urinating on a schedule) helps you learn to gradually increase the amount of urine you can comfortably hold. It’s most often recommended for women with an overactive bladder. “Many women do not know that they should be able to wait three to six hours between urinating. Bladder training retrains the way the brain and bladder interact to give the woman more bladder control,” says Dr. Wakamatsu. Weight loss and exercise can help women who are overweight or obese. Extra weight puts extra pressure on the bladder and pelvic muscles. Losing weight through a healthy diet and exercise helps relieve urinary incontinence. Studies have also shown that middle-aged women who are most physically active are least likely to develop incontinence. “These first line interventions can be very effective for many women. Approximately 70% of women will improve enough so they are satisfied with their bladder control. This does not mean that the women have perfect bladder control, but they can exercise and carry out daily activities without bothersome urinary incontinence,” says Dr. Wakamatsu. These lifestyle changes may also help: • Watch your fluid intake. Drink only when you feel thirsty, and don’t exceed six to eight 8-ounce cups of fluid per day from all sources, including soup. • If you smoke, stop. Quitting reduces coughing, which puts pressure on the bladder. • Minimize bladder irritants like caffeine, alcohol, carbonated drinks, spicy foods, and citrus fruits and flavorings. Most important, seek your doctor’s help if you have any issues with urinary incontinence. You don’t have to live with the condition, and you most likely can fix the problem.If you would like additional information, please do repost.

      Go to this topic
    • Fitness forum